Slow Distance Running And Its Benefits

 

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There are actually many advantages to doing long distance runs. Aside from building and strengthening the musculoskeletal system, it also develops the respiratory system. Plus, it’s an excellent method to release body toxins and clear your mind from the stress, anxiety, and pressures from the day’s work. Perhaps it’s time to try and mix long slow runs with your sprints.

If you’re a newbie at running, it may be hard to increase the stamina that it takes to do regular long-distance runs. A vital thing to keep in mind is your speed. It must be different after a few runs – varying average speed in a 5-kilometer than compared to when doing a 25-kilometer run. For some people, it’s always good to go with fast running and keeping the same speed. However, long-distance running at a slower speed has been proven to produce positive results, and more runners are encouraging their fellow runners to give it a try so they too can reap the benefits.

Definition Of Slow Running

Slow running is actually subjective, as each will have his or her speed. But a great method to identify a slow versus a fast run is to observe if one can make a constant conversation with a running mate. If he can talk while running, then that’s his slow-paced running speed.

Additionally, you can check your heart rate to determine what your slow speed is. Your rate should be at a range of 110 to 140 beats per minute if you are doing a gentle run. You’ll also notice that you’re breathing slowly without panting.

Benefits Of Slow Distance Running

  • It strengthens the muscles of the arms, legs, and torso
  • Regular slow running promotes an effective running form
  • It increases the body’s tolerance to physical discomfort, muscle soreness, and fatigue.
  • It instills patience and discipline.
  • It improves the status of the respiratory, musculoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems.
  • It increases muscle bulk and the number of muscle fibers, improving the muscles’ capacity to carry oxygen throughout the other parts of the body.
  • It strengthens the ligaments, joints, and tendons so they can withstand the stresses of slow and fast running.
  • It promotes physical and mental wellness.
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Undeniably, there are a lot of health benefits of slow distance running, which is why it is a great idea to combine it with your sprints. This technique will help you develop into a better running enthusiast because you are training your mind and body to be versatile and withstand longer distances. And before you know it, you are actually burning more calories compared to when you were doing pure sprinting. Sooner or later, you’ll be ready for even the high-intensity training sessions.

Frequency Requirements For Slow Distance Running

Similarly, the frequency of runs you can do is subjective, and, of course, depends on how often an individual goes running.

A slow long-distance run is usually classified as 50% longer than regular running. If your running schedule is three times weekly, then you can do two regular runs and one long slow distance run. When you’ve done this for a month or so, you’ll eventually see the difference in the way you run and how you feel when you run.

If you’re a runner, you tend to track your distance when you start long distance running. But instead of doing just that, try tracking your time instead. For instance, if you do one long distance run in a week, try increasing your time by five to ten minutes in the succeeding weeks.

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If, however, you’re an amateur, you can start slow running at 45 minutes. This is important as it doesn’t only help build muscle strength and recovery, but it also helps release toxins from those worked up muscles. For runs that 45 to 90 minutes long, you’re boosting your body’s capacity to carry oxygen and building up your stamina without too much mental and physical stress.

If you run for more than 90 minutes, you are educating your body to improve your body’s ability to cope with the discomfort and soreness that comes with the aftermath of running.

Takeaway

Finally, slow distance running decreases the risk of injury, which is much higher in those individuals who do fast runs. For that reason alone, you should give long and slow distance running a chance for your body to adapt, build, and withstand the different intensities that the body – and life – encounters.